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SUZANNE CAREY
Sr. DTLAL Columnist

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SUZANNE CAREY


"HOME"

Dear John,

I hope this letter finds you well. I must apologize for the lateness of my response to your note, inquiring as to when I might be returning home. But I needed time to come to terms with my personal definition of the meaning of “Home”. I wanted to make sure I was very clear in my understanding and where I decided to go from here.

After many long days and nights of searching for a beginning to my quest, I decided to start with the age old saying of “Home is where the heart is.” It seemed the most logical place to start, and as you know this to be true, logic is my go too when emotion wants to take over and cloud the issue. So on that premise I began to research my heart, asking it how it truly felt, and if truth be told some of the answers were difficult to hear.

Packing a bag, I decided that maybe if I moved to a new geographical location, something I had never seen or experienced before ,then maybe I would find a place I could call home. I traveled from one end of the country to the other, finding lodgings in bustling cities, slower paced suburban towns and beautiful quiet countrysides. Each of those places held a charm of their own, but none of them felt like home.

So wanting to branch out my research area, I proceeded to leave the United States and travel to even more distant and remote places. You see, while traveling America I always had a place to live, be it a small apartment in the city, a cabin in the country, or one of those tiny houses on a piece of land in the suburbs, none of them f elt like a home. I then thought that maybe if I just removed the four walls and lived in a place that only offered what nature provided, maybe then I would have a better understanding of “home”. So hopping the next flight out of the country, I found myself in a sparsely populated land that housed a village of indigenous people, whose language I knew I most likely could never learn in this lifetime. Fortunately they were a very kind people, and they took me in and allowed me live amongst them.. Even though communication through language was near impossible, I found a way to communicate through gesture and observation. It was such a blessing to watch this community of people, how they worked, played and raised their children. It was here that I was beginning to see what a home looked and felt like.

Continuing my travels I then came upon a tiny village in the mountains that was the home of a religious order of monks. They lived off the land, each one having a special skill set, be it tending the vegetable garden, taking care of the farm animals, baking their bread, cooking their food and making their own wine, which by the way was the best wine I ever drank. The one thing that impressed me the most about these wonderful monks was the music they made together, singing praise to their heavenly father. I never heard a more beautiful sound and I doubt I ever will again. This was a place filled with such love, the love of their creator and for each other. This was a home.

Flying back to the states, I had a long time to really think about what I had learned in my travels, the people I had met, the different cultures and what the meaning of home was to them. And even though their ways of living were all very different, there was one common thread... Love. Four walls made of many different materials could certainly make a house, but it was love that made that house a home. And in all honesty, I found that you don’t need a roof over your head to be at home, all you really need is love in your heart for the people, the animals, the life that surrounds you. Home truly is where the heart is, where love resides.

So my dearest John, to answer your question, When am I coming home...very soon. Another very important thing I learned as I traveled around the world, was that I love you and I was home all along. Thank you for giving me the freedom to find my answers, to be willing to trust in the love you knew we have, and for keeping the door open to the place I now call home.

All my Love 

Me 

More Amazing Stories 


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PHOTO CREDIT: SUZANNE CAREY

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