Home
FRONT PAGE
SAGE!
THE WITCH INTERVIEW
THE WINE GUY: MICHAEL WINTHROP
PEGGY BLACKWELL: Photography
MAMA TILA'S THAI HOME COOKING
POETRY CONNECTION
EDWARD HOPPER
THE CONNECTICUT MUSE: SUZANNE CAREY
SOMETHING SPECIAL FOR CHRISTMAS!
JOSS ROSSITER: South African Artist
AMY STEWART HALE - ARTIST INTERVIEW
VIRGINIA HEIN - ARTIST
FROM THERE TO HERE: BY GAYLE SLATEN
BY INVITATION: GUEST CREATIVES
HINDENBURG:
WILD THING EXPERIENCE
GUSTAV MAHLER
KOREATOWN
UK & EUROPEAN UNION BUREAU
EDDIE SOLIS: Punk Rocker-Transit Freak-Radio Host
STEVE HAMMOND
JENN VILETTA: FASCISM IS...
SAGA: UNAUTHORIZED DTLA HISTORY
LAC-USC MEDICAL CENTER REVEALED!
HISTORICAL POSTER ART: Vietnamese Patriotic Front
WPA POSTER ART: LESSER KNOWN EXAMPLES
OUR RUSSIAN HISTORICAL HERITAGE
DPRK REVEALED
LATIN AMERICAN BUREAU
SLAVERY IN AMERICA
TOM STONE: A WITNESS IN PURGATORY
MAGAZINE COMMENTS
A NEW TASTE
PERMANENT EXHIBITS
DTLAL MAGAZINE FAMILY ALBUM
CONTACTS
PAST PEEKS
ECOSPHERE RESOURCES
BRIAN BROWN: SOUTHERN HERITAGE
A KENTUCKY STORY
VICTORIAN WOMEN OF COLOR
EARLY TELEVISION!
MAPPLETHORPE & WAGSTAFF
SHARON MARIE TATE
BARBARA MULVAY
CARNEGIE HALL
A GAY GANGSTERS' LIFE

llkk.gif



PEGGY BLACKWELL

Photography

__________________

ret9.jpg

Interview with Arthur Meyerson

AM:  Where do you live and what do you do for a living?

PJB:  I live in Goldthwaite, Texas, located in the Hill Country.  My doctorate is in Experimental Psychology, and I am now retired.  Previously I worked at the University of New Mexico as a Professor and then the college Dean.  I retired and moved to Dubai, United Arab Emirates as a college dean at Zayed University.  I retired (again!) in 2010.

AM:  Where/when did you first develop your interest in photography?

PJB:  I've always taken photographs as "memory" shots from the time I was young.  While living in Colorado Springs, I took a course in black and white photography using a Leica that I had.  Learned to develop film and think about lighting. I always took photographs on travels and recently scanned pictures from trips to Egypt, Israel, India, and Hong Kong.  Some of them are pretty good, but the memories are better.  I really got interested in more serious photography when I moved to Dubai in 2004.  There was so much to capture and, of course, travel to places I never thought I'd get to that needed a more serious approach and camera.

AM:  Of all the art forms in the world, why photography?

PJB:  I painted while in high school and college, but by no means would say I'm an artist.  It was this interest, perhaps, that led me to explore the development of spatial ability while a professor.   Back then, I didn't think of photography as a spatial challenge until after your workshop as I continued to mull over what you said and had us do.  I began to think of the spatial relationships you talked about:  patterns, lines, curves, shadows.  Photography began to take on new meaning for me.  I was so frustrated during the workshop that I couldn't get what I wanted, but I'm getting better. 

AM:  What approach do you take to photography?

PJB:  I look and try to see.  (I don't think they are the same thing.)  People talk about the photographer's eye:  my brother has it, I don't.  So I work at seeing.  As I walk or drive, I create images and think about what would make a compelling photograph. I look for lines, shadows, reflections, color.   I ask myself, "Would I like it on my wall?"  You know, when I look back at my photographs from your workshop, I didn't select the ones I should have to show.  

AM:  How often do you photograph?

PJB:  Not often enough, for sure.  I seem to go in cycles – many photographs, then stop to review and edit them.  I have gone on several workshops since yours and that leads to days and days of reviewing and thinking.

AM:  Other than workshops, have you had any formal training in photography?

PJB:  The course I mentioned above plus a photography 101 course.  I'm going to take a course in Macro photography in a couple of weeks.  I did an Equine Photoshop Course that was super.

AM:  What is your favorite genre of photography?

PJB:  Wildlife, including birds, followed by nature in general. 

AM:  What inspires you or where do you seek inspiration?

PJB:  Reflections and color inspire me, along with birds and animals.   I had the chance to photograph horses outside Santa Fe and absolutely loved it.   I worked at capturing the sense of their movement, their majesty.  Shadows, texture, movement were significant.

AM:  Who do you most admire (past or present) and why or who's art do you admire?

PJB:  Pretty open-ended question there, Arthur.  I most admire my parents but in the public arena, I admire Nelson Mandala.  As for art, I like Claude Monet and Winslow Homer (studied his work in college).  Photographers, other than you, I like Art Wolfe and, for his passion about endangered species, Joel Sartore.  I did a workshop with Tony Sweet that almost did me in climbing the Tent Rocks National Monument in New Mexico, but I like his photography.  Music: well, I'm a Texan.  I really enjoy Willie Nelson.

AM:  What is your greatest personal achievement?

PJB:  Probably surviving as a college dean in two different universities.  I think deans are caught in the middle  between the faculty and the upper administration -- like the mid-point of an hour glass with the sand going both ways.  On a lesser scale, learning photoshop.

AM:  Name somewhere and/or someone you'd love to photograph?

PJB:  I'm not much into photographing people, but the somewhere is going back to Zimbabwe to Mana Pools.  More realistically, I hope to go to Big Bend National Park.

AM:  Do you have a favorite photography book?

PJB:  I'm a book collector and like those that make me think, but I especially like The Photographer's Eye by Michael Freeman.

AM:  What do you collect?

PJB:  Other than books, art, sculpture, and jewelry from my travel, national and international.  All over my house; I need more walls.

AM:  What is your most valuable possession?

PJB:  I like to think all my material possessions are valuable, but to single one out, I'd pick a porcelain plate given to me by Sensei Manji Inoue, who is a Japanese Living Treasure.  It's not the most expensive possession, but it certainly has a story and memories.

AM:  If you were to invite 1-5 personalities for a dinner conversation, who would they be?

PJB:  I'd invite Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, and the Dalai Lama with Barack Obama.  I would cook.  What I fantastic conversation that would be!

AM:  Aside from photography, what is your favorite pastime?

PJB:  Reading, anything and everything.  I also enjoy cooking, especially baking.

AM:  What camera and equipment do you use?

PJB:  I started in Dubai with a Nikon D40 and now have a D750. I've slowly acquired more gear and use an Induro travel tripod with a Really Right Stuff ball head.  I bought a Nikkor 70-300mm lens for my first safari and still rely on it a lot, but I also have a 105mm, a 50mm, and wide angle lenses.

AM:  What is/are your goals in photography?

PJB:  To continue to learn and improve, to continue to enjoy. 

AM:  Tell us something about yourself that we don't know.

PJB:  I worked with the National Geographic Society for about 10 years as the coordinator of the New Mexico Geographic Alliance.  On a lighter note, I play Candy Crush every day.

AM:  Do you have a website or some other place we can see more of your pictures?

PJB:  I use Smugmug as a kind of repository (TexasGal.smugmug.com); I also have a facebook page, Peggy Blackwell Photography (https://www.facebook.com/PeggyBlackwellPhotography/) where I put whatever strikes my fancy.  I have photographs for sale on Fine Art America and Society 6 (links:  http://peggy-blackwell.pixels.com/  and https://society6.com/peggyblackwell)

 


SEND PEGGY A MESSAGE!

dtdt7.jpg

docent.jpg

pcgggp1.jpg

CLICK TO ENLARGE
pillson.jpg

ppc6.jpg

post88.jpg

ppc3.jpg

gator.jpg

post77.jpg








llkk.gif